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Why your CV isn’t working

26/11/2013 by

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Why your CV isn’t working

It’s too long

2 pages is the ideal length for a good CV. If you are a contractor and have had several roles in a short amount of time, you need to prioritise. The last 3 years should be detailed, everything prior to that should be short and sweet. If you really need to push your CV onto say 3, 4, 5 pages ensure that the information is relevant and easy to read.

It has too much bulk text

Recruiters, hiring managers and anyone who gets your CV on their desk will skim read. The second they see a huge paragraph of bulk text they are put off. Your achievements/ duties need to be in short snappy bullet points and be achievement based.

It is too colourful

Having a subtle theme of navy blue running through your CV through Headers and footers and subtitles is absolutely fine. But having your name in salmon pink, your contact details in neon green and your text in brown is just too much for the brain to take in. Your CV is a professional document and needs to look like one!

It is dated

Using the word curriculum vitae is a thing of the past, going back to your job in a bakery in 1985 is also dating you and your CV. Ensure your CV is current and up to date. You should always update your CV, with current projects and ensure it is always ready to go out. You never know when an amazing opportunity might arise.

It has a picture of your dog on it

It sounds awfully silly, but some people do this. Montash had a CV and under the interests section there was a picture of a dog and next to it a short blurb on the breed of the dog, his name, his age and that he likes to go for walks. Please maintain professionalism and if you do want to express your interests keep it short and simple.

It isn’t easy to skim read

On opening your CV, someone wants to know within the first 5 seconds. What your name is, where you are, what you do, and the company you do it for. If it takes longer than 5 seconds to cipher this information out of the scrawl then you have failed in keeping your CV clear and concise. Make sure for every job title you have your job title, the company name, location and the dates worked there. It makes your CV reader friendly and will push you further forward in the recruitment process.

The formatting is wrong

Formatting is so important. Think of it like this, if you had a beautiful designer jacket, lovely designer trousers, really expensive Italian shoes and a shirt to die for- but none of the sizes/ styles/ colours went together and you just threw it on. It is so important for your CV to aesthetically look good. Size 10/11 font, easy to read font, good margins, no crazy section breaks, no tables just clean simple elegance and flow. Your CV should reflect you as a person, and if you are a bit wacky or a designer of some sort showcase this in the right way!

Written by Maya Gardiner, Internal Communications Manager

www.montash.com

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