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Big data market trends

21/07/2014 by

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Big data is one of the hot topics in IT, with significant implications for both architecture and strategy and IT recruiters.

What is big data? It can be defined as any collection of data that has expanded at such a rate and has become so complex that to process it using traditional data processing methods becomes problematic. As such, its complexity means it is disruptive in nature, but successfully processed and managed, big data may result in more accurate analyses and improved decisions – a goal that every organisation aspires to. This is because big data enables analysis of single sets of related data rather than separate and smaller sets and, therefore, allows correlations to be made between data that otherwise might not be possible. 

As far back as 2011, the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) had identified big data as an issue that organisations need to be serious about, suggesting that it was poised to become a key competitive advantage for companies that recognised its inherent value. MGI also identified a shortage of talent with the necessary skills to harness big data as an issue that would face organisations. By extension, this is also a relevant issue for recruiters. The institute suggested that there would be a shortage of not only talent with the relevant deep analytical skills, but also of analysts with the knowledge and experience to leverage big data in order to make the right decisions. Given the limited potential of the talent pool, there is an obvious opportunity for smart recruiters to assist clients in getting the right employees or contractors on board.

The good news for organisations is that advancements in technology are allowing them to leverage big data to good effect. These advancements include the availability of inexpensive and abundant storage solutions, the creation of faster processors, the emergence of open source and distributed big data systems and the flexibility afforded by cloud computing solutions.

The challenge posed by big data to IT recruitment centres is to identify the right candidates with the right skill sets to successfully leverage big data for the organisations that require it. The skill sets necessary include the ability to establish relevance and context, and to determine what data can be set aside in storage for future use if required. Alternatively, an organisation may have identified the need to analyse all of the data available to it, requiring IT staff skilled in using high-performance analytics in respect of large amounts of data. The technologies relevant here include in-database processing, grid computing and in-memory analytics.

This article is written by our BI,Data and Analytics Consultant Colin McGill, for more information please contact Colin McGill on: +44 (0) 20 7014 0230 or email Colin on: colinm@montash.com

Montash is a multi-award winning, global IT recruitment firm. Specialising in permanent and contract positions across mid-senior appointments which cover a wide range of industry sectors and IT functions, including:

ERP, BI & Data, Information Security, IT Architecture & Strategy, Scientific Technologies, Demand IT and Business Engagement, Digital and E-commerce, Infrastructure and Service Delivery, Project and Programme Delivery.

With offices based in London, Montash has completed assignments in over 30 countries and has appointed technical professionals from board level to senior and mid-management in permanent and contract roles.

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