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New technology predicts and identifies future cyberthreats

1/07/2014 by


Cybercrime is becoming an increasingly important area of interest for companies, with firms around the world having to implement innovative strategies and safeguards to protect themselves from infiltration. With attacks almost certain in this day and age, it is vital for executives to develop coping strategies for when a crime does occur so that their organisation is not crippled; now, a new piece of software is said to be able to identify cyberthreats before they occur, giving companies time to take action.

The new system comes from Darktrace, a company that sells itself on being able to spot things that are out of the ordinary. The new self-learning cyber-intelligence platform provides users with the ability to detect emerging anomalies in real time. This is vital because most existing security tools use current virus knowledge to detect threats, which means that firms are vulnerable to brand new risks that have not yet been identified or disseminated through various security tools via updates.

Founded in Cambridge, England, Darktrace was developed by a team of government intelligence experts and machine learning specialists. The program is currently utilised by 50 of the world’s largest firms, which are able to protect themselves against advanced internal and external cyberthreats occurring in real time. One of the advantages of the program is that rather than alerting executives to a whole host of false positive risks, Darktrace analyses the raw data first; over time, probabilistic maths is used to cluster, priorities and visualise anomalies and potential risks.

Darktrace’s chief executive officer, Andrew France, said that the latest version of Darktrace extends its previous risk and adds 3D visualisation. “As we continue to move away from the old model of building walls around an organisation, including tools such as intrusion prevention systems, it is clear that the next generation of cyberdefence solutions must assume that infiltration may already have happened. What we have is a great example of this new generation of self-learning systems, which constantly adapt to evolving information.”

Darktrace is currently the world’s fastest-growing cyberdefence firm. It bases its solutions on pioneering Bayesian mathematics and has developed a new niche in cybersolutions: enterprise immune system technology. With offices already in London, New York, Milan, Washington DC, Paris and San Francisco, Darktrace is set to continue expanding as businesses require increased protection from cybercrime.

This article was written by Montash.

Montash is a multi-award winning, global IT recruitment firm. Specialising in permanent and contract positions across mid-senior appointments which cover a wide range of industry sectors and IT functions, including:

ERP, BI & Data, Information Security, IT Architecture & Strategy, Scientific Technologies, Demand IT and Business Engagement, Digital and E-commerce, Infrastructure and Service Delivery, Project and Programme Delivery.

With offices based in London, Montash has completed assignments in over 30 countries and has appointed technical professionals from board level to senior and mid-management in permanent and contract roles.

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