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Red Hat Targets Petabyte Scale, Big Data With Storage Server 3

3/10/2014 by

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Red Hat on Thursday unveiled a major upgrade to its Red Hat Storage Server technology to give it petabyte scalability, improved data protection and easy integration into Red Hat Enterprise Linux deployments.

The new Red Hat Storage Server 3 is the second major release of the technology since Red Hat in late 2011 purchased Gluster, developer of the GlusterFS scale-out NAS file system on which it is based.

Red Hat Storage Server 3 has at its heart the Gluster version 3.6 open-source, software-defined technology, said Irshad Raihan, senior principal product marketing manager for storage and big data at Red Hat.

It was designed to help customers better manage the explosion in the amount of data being stored, the increasingly complex nature of enterprise storage and a need for increased control over data for regulatory and governance purposes, Raihan told CRN.

"Line of business administrators have become big buyers of IT," he said. "But today, IT is not flexible. There is a lot of proprietary storage. Open-source, software-defined storage is more flexible and provides the best efficiency."

Red Hat Storage Server 3 has five new features distinguishing it from earlier versions, Raihan said.

The first is a big jump in capacity to up to 19 petabytes per cluster. Red Hat Storage Server 3 can be configured with up to 128 nodes, each with up to 60 storage drives, up from a maximum of 64 nodes with 36 drives in the previous version.

It also includes built-in data protection via on-line snapshots to provide point-in-time copies for recovery and allows end users to recover files and volumes without administrator involvement, he said.

Also new is the ability to easily add the technology as a layer on top of existing Red Hat Enterprise Linux implementations via RPM, formerly known as Red Hat Package Manager.

The fourth is improved monitoring and logging of storage operations and issues using the Nagios open source monitoring service which plugs directly into the Red hat storage console.

This article has been extracted from http://www.crn.com/, please click on this link to read the article in full http://www.crn.com/news/storage/300074265/red-hat-targets-petabyte-scale-big-data-with-storage-server-3.htm

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