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Sika Meshes Salesforce Customer Data With ERP Apps

4/12/2014 by Sharon Shahzad

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Sika Group turns to Jitterbit to make Salesforce.com software-as-a-service function with SAP enterprise applications

It's a common problem. A company makes its first major foray into cloud services and stumbles into trouble uniting data generated in the cloud with the general ledger and other on-premises, backend systems.

Sika Group is a 16,000-employee, Switzerland-headquartered, international specialty chemicals company that produces special sealants, bonding agents, and other chemicals used in the construction and automotive industries, including chemicals that slow the curing of concrete so that it may be pumped aloft to build a skyscraper. Revenues amount to $5.14 billion a year (Swiss dollars roughly equivalent to US).

In 2011, Sika adopted Salesforce.com for its customer relationship management system in the US, where its largest revenues are produced. Sika started generating customer data inside its Salesforce SaaS databases. Soon it found that data was needed by its existing SAP enterprise resource management applications. Sika needed to figure out how to unite the two.

Rob Blemhof, senior VP of IT for Sika North America, said Sika started out by looking at commercial application and data connector/adaptor products "but we were shocked by the cost. Licenses had a six-digit price tag." By turning to the commercially supported, but open source, Jitterbit system, Sika got a data integration system at what Blemhof said was "one-fifth" the cost.

Blemhof characterized Sika as "a very conservative Swiss company" that in the past had shied away from much direct dependence on open source code or SaaS. But the North American IT group of 21 people convinced the much larger corporate IT group that adopting Salesforce and integrating it with Jitterbit was good value for the money. In addition, Jitterbit shifted away from open source into a commercial subscription model in 2010.

This article has been extracted from http://www.informationweek.com, please click on this link to read the article in full http://www.informationweek.com/cloud/software-as-a-service/sika-meshes-salesforce-customer-data-with-erp-apps/d/d-id/1317774

Montash is a multi-award winning, global technology recruitment business. Specialising in permanent and contract positions across mid-senior appointments across a wide range of industry sectors and IT functions, including:

ERP, BI & Data, Information Security, IT Architecture & Strategy, Energy & Technologies, Demand IT and Business Engagement, Digital and E-commerce, Leadership Talent, Infrastructure and Service Delivery, Project and Programme Delivery.

Montash is headquartered in Old Street, London, in the heart of the technology hub. Montash has completed assignments in over 30 countries and has appointed technical professionals from board level to senior and mid management in permanent and contract roles.

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