Connecting to LinkedIn...

W1siziisijiwmtuvmdqvmtuvmdgvntqvmzgvnzi1l01ptlrbu0hfqkxpr19vtljftkrfukvex0lnqudfx3jlc2l6zwrfyw5kx3jlbmrlcmvklmpwzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwimtkymhgxmjuwiyjdxq

Blog

Study Uncovers 40,000 Malicious Mobile Banking Apps

23/01/2015 by Sharon Shahzad

W1siziisijiwmtuvmdevmjmvmtcvmtgvmzkvodc5l21vymlszv9iyw5raw5nxze0ndauanbnil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci2mdb4ndawxhuwmdnlil1d

Mobile banking is an increasingly popular way to stay on top of one’s finances, with the ability to check balances, transfer money and even deposit checks virtually. Unfortunately, the sector is also a rich tapestry of criminal activity, with 11% of mobile banking apps categorized as “suspicious.”

According to research findings from RiskIQ, there’s a notable prevalence of suspicious mobile apps related to banking. The company found that more than 40,000 (or 11%) of the 350,000 apps which reference banking in the world’s top 90 app stores contain malware or suspicious binaries. Roughly half of those (20,000) actually contained trojan malware.

For the survey, RiskIQ inspected the apps by emulating human behavior to detect suspect applications, application tampering and brand impersonation. Apps were labeled suspicious based on whether they contained malware or suspicious binaries identified by a consortium of 70 anti-virus vendors.

Aside from the malware infestations, of the more than 40,000 mobile apps listed as suspicious, 21,076 contained adware, 3,823 contained spyware, 209 contained exploit code and 178 contained malicious JavaScript.

“Mobile banking is now a way of life for most people,” said Elias Manousos, CEO of RiskIQ, in a statement. “It also presents a lucrative opportunity for criminals to commit fraud. One of the easiest ways to steal a victim’s login and other personal information is using malware and apps with excessive permissions.”

And indeed, of the 40,000 suspicious apps, a large number exhibited excessive permissions. In fact 8,672 could capture device logs, 8,408 could record audio, 7,188 could access contacts lists and 4,892 could read SMS messages. Further, thousands could write to contacts lists, disable key guards, read the device’s settings and access location/GPS information. Perhaps most concerningly, 1,148 could install packages.

This article has been extracted from http://www.infosecurity-magazine.com, please click on this link to read the article in full http://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/40000-malicious-mobile-banking-apps/

Montash is a multi-award winning global technology recruitment business. Specialising in permanent and contract positions across mid-senior appointments across a wide range of industry sectors and IT functions, including:

ERP Recruitment, BI & Data Recruitment, Information Security Recruitment, IT Architecture & Strategy Recruitment , Energy Technology Recruitment, Demand IT and Business Engagement Recruitment, Digital and E-commerce Recruitment, Leadership Talent, Infrastructure and Service Delivery Recruitment, Project and Programme Delivery Recruitment.

Montash is headquartered in Old Street, London, in the heart of the technology hub. Montash has completed assignments in over 30 countries and has appointed technical professionals from board level to senior and mid management in permanent and contract roles.

comments powered by Disqus

Social Stream

Latest News

W1siziisijiwmtcvmdkvmjkvmdgvmtmvmjkvmjgyl1vudgl0bgvkigrlc2lnbiaomjuplmpwzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwimzgwedewmcmixv0

Are PSLs a Blocker or an Enabler?

2017-10-02 11:00:00 +0100

The use of a Preferred Supplier List (PSL) was intended to support and strengthen relationships and performance between organisations and their third party suppliers. As the technical landscape continues to evolve at rapid rate recruitment and demand for new skills becomes more intense. Are PSLs still the solution or an obstacle to sourcing the right talent? The traditional PSL A dedicated list of partners intended to guarantee quality and availability ...

W1siziisijiwmtcvmdkvmjevmdgvndmvmduvmtmxl1vudgl0bgvkigrlc2lnbiaomjmplmpwzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwimzgwedewmcmixv0

Why do we punish the victims of hacking?

2017-09-21 09:00:00 +0100

Hacks occur every 39 seconds, with 95% of them targeting governments, retailers and the tech industry. If the hackers are caught, they'll face prison time under the Computer Misuse Act. More often than not, the businesses who are victims of those attacks expose themselves to punishment of their own. The laws that determine the duty of protection owed to businesses and their customers is both vague and broad, making them question just how much protection...