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Automakers Reveal That Security and Privacy Issues Are Rampant

10/02/2015 by Sharon Shahzad

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As automobiles become increasingly connected, security and privacy gaps are rearing their heads when it comes to cars and trucks. New standards are needed to plug the oversights and prevent hackers from driving away with vehicle control and personal information, according to a report from Sen. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.).

Sixteen major automobile manufacturers responded to questions from Senator Markey in 2014 about how vehicles may be vulnerable to hackers, and how driver information is collected and protected. The results were not positive: The lawmaker’s report shows a vehicle fleet that has fully adopted wireless technologies like Bluetooth and even wireless internet access, without addressing the real possibilities of hacker infiltration into vehicle systems. Also, there is overwhelming potential for the widespread collection of driver and vehicle information, since few automakers have implemented privacy protections for how that information is shared and used.

“The ability of smart cars to put us at risk is just a small part of the larger trend towards everything in our lives becoming computer controlled and networked,” Lance Cottrell, chief scientist at Ntrepid, commented via email. “Some of these have the ability to violate our privacy, while others have the possibility of harming us physically or damaging critical infrastructure. Automakers, like most other companies involved in the Internet of Things, are primarily focused on ‘cool’ capabilities with security being an afterthought at best.”

Senator Markey posed his questions after studies showed how hackers can get into the controls of some popular vehicles, causing them to suddenly accelerate, turn, kill the brakes, activate the horn, control the headlights, and modify the speedometer and gas gauge readings. Additional concerns came from the rise of navigation and other features that record and send location or driving history information.

This article has been extracted from http://www.infosecurity-magazine.com, please click on this link to read the article in full http://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/automakers-security-and-privacy/

Montash is a multi-award winning global technology recruitment business. Specialising in permanent and contract positions across mid-senior appointments across a wide range of industry sectors and IT functions, including:

ERP Recruitment, BI & Data Recruitment, Information Security Recruitment, IT Architecture & Strategy Recruitment , Energy Technology Recruitment, Demand IT and Business Engagement Recruitment, Digital and E-commerce Recruitment, Leadership Talent, Infrastructure and Service Delivery Recruitment, Project and Programme Delivery Recruitment.

Montash is headquartered in Old Street, London, in the heart of the technology hub. Montash has completed assignments in over 30 countries and has appointed technical professionals from board level to senior and mid management in permanent and contract roles.

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