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Raspberry Pi 2 launches with 6x faster processor and Windows 10 promise

3/02/2015 by Sharon Shahzad

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The Raspberry Pi Foundation revealed the official second edition of its Raspberry Pi SOC (system-on-a-chip) computer today, promising speed increases of up to six times, and compatibility with upcoming ARM builds of Windows 10.

Founder Eben Upton said that the foundation is now targeting users beyond the  education sector that was originally the target of the Pi in 2012, and is "hoping to have people buying this as the second PC in their house". He hopes to continue to serve the hobbyist and - increasingly - the enterprise market with the cheap yet reliable machines, too.

Upton said that between 2 million and 2.5 million Raspberry Pi units -which are now largely built in the UK - had been sold in 2014 and that it would "be nice to keep that up".

The Raspberry Pi 2 Model B consists of a quad-core ARMv7 Broadcom BCM2836 processor running at 900MHz, supported by 1GB RAM, four USB 2.0 ports, a full-size HDMI out visual display port, micro-USB power source and a micro-SD port for storing data and loading an operating system.

Because the chip is built on the ARMv7 architecture and not ARMv6 as in previous models of the Raspberry Pi, Upton explained how this "broadens out the range of operating systems" available for the machine.

This includes Canonical's popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, which, said Upton, "a lot of people had wanted since the first day", and also Windows 10 - "which I think is going to raise a few eyebrows," he laughed.

"We've been working with Microsoft for about the last six months to enable Windows 10 on Raspberry Pi. It runs - I've seen it running - and it's pretty cool."

He continued: "The intention here is to have a device you can use to build [Windows] RT devices with screens attached. And it participates in the broad range of Windows APIs, so it can take Windows 10 applications you can run on a Surface, on a PC or on a Windows mobile phone."

This article has been extracted from http://www.computing.co.uk, please click on this link to read the article in full http://www.computing.co.uk/ctg/news/2393184/raspberry-pi-2-launches-with-6x-faster-processor-and-windows-10-promise

Montash is a multi-award winning global technology recruitment business. Specialising in permanent and contract positions across mid-senior appointments across a wide range of industry sectors and IT functions, including:

ERP Recruitment, BI & Data Recruitment, Information Security Recruitment, IT Architecture & Strategy Recruitment , Energy Technology Recruitment, Demand IT and Business Engagement Recruitment, Digital and E-commerce Recruitment, Leadership Talent, Infrastructure and Service Delivery Recruitment, Project and Programme Delivery Recruitment.

Montash is headquartered in Old Street, London, in the heart of the technology hub. Montash has completed assignments in over 30 countries and has appointed technical professionals from board level to senior and mid management in permanent and contract roles.

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