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Symantec Publishes Crash Course in Car Security

26/08/2015 by Sharon Shahzad

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Security firm Symantec has released a research report containing advice and practical guidance for combatting the increasingly significant issue of automotive security vulnerabilities.

Car security has hit the headlines this year with security researchers demonstrating the remote take-over of a car’s braking system, and BMW revealing a flaw that enables, among other problems, the remote unlocking of car doors.

The latter issue is tackled head-on in Symantec’s Building Comprehensive Security into Cars  white paper which proposes that applying security updates to cars is problematic given that the traditional mechanism of applying security patches in IT infrastructure does not apply.

Solutions, Symantec explains, must be “in a context that works both within the car, and at scale for carmakers.” Real-time, over-the-air (OTA) patching, for example, is in conflict with the multi-year safety certification processes currently required by the automotive industry.

Symantec also argues that many keyless entry systems, which work by detecting the proximity of virtual key to car, are not satisfactorily capturing position and proximity data with proper precautions. Symantec advises “healthier combinations of Global Positioning System (GPS), cellular, Wi-Fi, and accelerometer telemetry, all properly digitally signed by both the car and the car keys.”

The simpler signal-strength triangulation mechanism deployed in many systems is open to relay attacks, whereby a would-be carjacker can relay the key signal to the car and vice versa with a phoney key. By deploying “digital capture of location, signing data on capture, and using secure boot and code signing to ensure that firmware isn’t tampered,” carmakers could mitigate this, the report states.

The security firm also highlighted the threats posed by in-vehicle Bluetooth implementations and vulnerabilities in systems that stream entertainment and navigation data.

This article has been extracted from http://www.infosecurity-magazine.com, please click on this link to read the article in full http://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/symantec-publishes-crash-course-in/

Montash is a multi-award winning global technology recruitment business. Specialising in permanent and contract positions across mid-senior appointments across a wide range of industry sectors and IT functions, including:

ERP Recruitment, BI & Data Recruitment, Information Security Recruitment, Enterprise Architecture & Strategy Recruitment , Energy Technology Recruitment, Demand IT and Business Engagement Recruitment, Digital and E-commerce Recruitment, Leadership Talent, Infrastructure and Service Delivery Recruitment, Project and Programme Delivery Recruitment.

Montash is headquartered in Old Street, London, in the heart of the technology hub. Montash has completed assignments in over 30 countries and has appointed technical professionals from board level to senior and mid management in permanent and contract roles.

 

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