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New PoS Trojan Steals Card Data, Intercepts Browser Requests

18/09/2015 by Sharon Shahzad

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Researchers from anti-virus firm Dr.Web have discovered new malware designed to infect point-of-sale (PoS) terminals and capable of intercepting GET and POST requests sent from Web browsers on infected machines.

Dubbed Trojan.MWZLesson, the Trojan can modify the registry branch in charge with autorun on the infected PoS terminals, while also being able to check the device’s RAM for credit card information, the security firm said.

All of the acquired bankcard data along with intercepted communication, including GET and POST requests, is sent to the command and control server. However, the malware is also capable of executing a series of commands, which makes it even more dangerous.

Dr.Web explains in a blog post that the commands supported by the Trojan include CMD (forward the command to the interpreter - cmd.exe), UPDATE, FIND (search for documents using a mask), DDoS (mount an HTTP Flood attack), and rate (set a time interval for communication with the command and control server).

Additionally, Trojan.MWZLesson supports a LOADER command, which allows it to download and run a file (dll—using the regsrv tool, vbs—using the wscript tool, exe—run directly), and communicates with the server over the HTTP protocol. Packages sent by the malware are not encrypted, but the server ignores any package that does not include a special cookie parameter.

According to Dr.Web researchers, the Trojan borrows code from previously discovered Dexter malware that targets PoS terminals, while its architecture looks similar to that of Neutrino, though it is rather a downsized version of the latter.

The Trojan can also steal data from the Microsoft Mail application, as well as FTP login credentials, the experts said. 

This article has been extracted from http://www.securityweek.com, please click on this link to read the article in full http://www.securityweek.com/new-pos-trojan-steals-card-data-intercepts-browser-requests

Montash is a multi-award winning global technology recruitment business. Specialising in permanent and contract positions across mid-senior appointments across a wide range of industry sectors and IT functions, including:

ERP Recruitment, BI & Data Recruitment, Information Security Recruitment, Enterprise Architecture & Strategy Recruitment , Energy Technology Recruitment, Demand IT and Business Engagement Recruitment, Digital and E-commerce Recruitment, Leadership Talent, Infrastructure and Service Delivery Recruitment, Project and Programme Delivery Recruitment.

Montash is headquartered in Old Street, London, in the heart of the technology hub. Montash has completed assignments in over 30 countries and has appointed technical professionals from board level to senior and mid-management in permanent and contract roles.

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