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SAP reveals HANA Vora software engine for boosting big data analytics

3/09/2015 by Sharon Shahzad

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SAP has revealed HANA Vora, a software engine designed to help developers and data scientists query big data stored in Hadoop clusters and SAP HANA.

Vora has been built as an extension of the Apache Spark, and is effectively an in-memory query processor that can make the process of data analysis more interactive.

It also enables analysis to be carried out in context with a company's business processes, so that the information gleaned from querying big data is more relevant to the company.

For example, financial institutions could use Vora to detect anomalies in transactional and customer data, and use the analysis to fight fraud and manage financial risks.

Telecoms companies could use Vora to conduct analysis on data relating to network traffic patterns, and optimise bandwidth and services by avoiding traffic bottlenecks on the network.

SAP claimed that Vora can help data scientists and developers discover more insightful information from their analysis by enabling queries to be fired at a wide pool of corporate and Hadoop-stored data.

Interestingly, Vora does not need to be used directly with HANA if customers prefer to use a different database management platform or to conduct analysis just on data in Hadoop.

SAP is positioning Vora as a tool for improving the analysis of increasing amounts of data being harvested from numerous sources, such as business apps and the Internet of Things.

Vora is also being targeted at a variety of industries, and SAP is touting its potential use in the financial, telecoms, healthcare and manufacturing sectors.

SAP explained that Vora could aid the process of preventative maintenance and product recalls by analysing bill-on-material and service records with data from sensors.

Quentin Clark, chief technology officer at SAP, said that the introduction of Vora is part of SAP's strategy to help businesses make use of digital data.

This article has been extracted from http://www.v3.co.uk, please click on this link to read the article in full http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/2424251/sap-reveals-hana-vora-software-engine-for-boosting-big-data-analytics

Montash is a multi-award winning global technology recruitment business. Specialising in permanent and contract positions across mid-senior appointments across a wide range of industry sectors and IT functions, including:

ERP Recruitment, BI & Data Recruitment, Information Security Recruitment, Enterprise Architecture & Strategy Recruitment , Energy Technology Recruitment, Demand IT and Business Engagement Recruitment, Digital and E-commerce Recruitment, Leadership Talent, Infrastructure and Service Delivery Recruitment, Project and Programme Delivery Recruitment.

Montash is headquartered in Old Street, London, in the heart of the technology hub. Montash has completed assignments in over 30 countries and has appointed technical professionals from board level to senior and mid-management in permanent and contract roles.

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