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Data analysis is not just for trade: it can combat some of the world’s biggest resource issues

23/11/2015 by

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Analytics can be used to tackle some of the world’s biggest issues that could one day affect all of us, such as water scarcity and access to clean water.

In what seems to have happened in a very short space of time, it’s now fair to say that the UK has become a ‘data-driven’ nation. Many of us use data every day to analyse personal information; whether it is tracking our fitness levels or calorie counting, getting a better grip on our finances or even working out how we could be spending our time differently. 

Ultimately, at the heart of all this personal data analysis is the search for doing things better; looking for ways in which things can be improved.

Naturally, there’s actually a lot that can be done to improve the way we live in a broader sense as well, namely, using data to look at issues that we previously thought out of our control which gives us a fuller picture of the situation so we can see what steps we can all be taking to help out.

Of course, the main issues here are environmental - and using data to help us get better insights into the way our environments around the world work.

Take for instance one of the biggest environmental concerns, water scarcity and access to clean water, ranked by The World Economic Forum Global Risks Report in 2015 as the number one global risk.

Access to water should essentially be a basic human right and yet, three quarters of a billion people across the world have no access to clean drinking water. In fact, the United Nations estimates that 1.2 billion people are living in areas of water scarcity.

That’s almost one-fifth the population of the entire planet without ready access to something that a lot of us actually take for granted.

By no means is the UK exempt from this issue either. The UK is one of nine European countries that has been described as ‘water-stressed’ by the European Environment Agency and the situation in the East of England is regularly singled out as an area of particular concern.

This article has been extracted from http://www.information-age.com, please click on this link to read the article in full http://www.information-age.com/technology/information-management/123460546/data-analysis-not-just-trade-it-can-combat-some-worlds-biggest-resource-issues

Montash is a multi-award winning global technology recruitment business. Specialising in permanent and contract positions across mid-senior appointments across a wide range of industry sectors and IT functions, including:

ERP Recruitment, BI & Data Recruitment, Information Security Recruitment, Enterprise Architecture & Strategy Recruitment, Energy Technology Recruitment, Demand IT and Business Engagement Recruitment, Digital and E-commerce Recruitment, Leadership Talent, Infrastructure and Service Delivery Recruitment, Project and Programme Delivery Recruitment.

Montash is headquartered in Old Street, London, in the heart of the technology hub. Montash has completed assignments in over 30 countries and has appointed technical professionals from board level to senior and mid-management in permanent and contract roles.

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